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reelmassillon


ReelMassillon is a once-a-month film series held at The Lincoln Theatre in Massillon, OH, thanks to support from The Massillon Museum, ArtsinStark, Historic Massillon Main Street, The Ohio Humanities Council, and KinoArts. The films are culled from world-class sources like festival lineups and film society calendars. See below for the schedule and more detail.

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reelmassillon


ReelMassillon is a once-a-month film series held at The Lincoln Theatre in Massillon, OH, thanks to support from The Massillon Museum, ArtsinStark, Historic Massillon Main Street, The Ohio Humanities Council, and KinoArts. The films are culled from world-class sources like festival lineups and film society calendars. See below for the schedule and more detail.

"Good and challenging movies are limited to release in big cities…

Whole states never see the best new films on big screens."

~~ Roger Ebert

Not anymore, Rog. Not anymore...

Why ReelMassillon?

ReelMassillon's goal is to vivify Massillon's cinema culture by stirring the community into a broader and deeper engagement with its own history. It's committed to doing so in a way that addresses the truths of its present and the possibilities of its future – both respecting tradition and breaking from it.

"We live in a box of space and time. Movies are windows in its walls."  

~~ Roger Ebert

Who Are We?

We are a program committee directed by Kurtiss Hare, of KinoArts LLC, with operational support from The Massillon Museum and The Lincoln Theatre. Our foundational support was provided by ArtsinStarkHistoric Massillon Main Street, and The Ohio Humanities Council.

"The end of a picture is always an end of a life."

~~ Sam Peckinpah

What Do We Do?

We bring challenging movies to The Lincoln's big screen and we provide context that you simply will not get at the cineplex: introductions, discussions, Q&A's, and special events where you'll get to interact with other folks who love the movies as much as you do. All this comes for a suggested donation of $5 to help keep us going.

"Movies do not just mirror the culture of any given time; they also create it."

~~ bell hooks

Where is The Lincoln Theatre?

 

 

The Lincoln Theatre

156 Lincoln Way East

Massillon, Ohio 44646

What's Playing?

August 29th, 2014: A Summer's Tale. Éric Rohmer's breeziest seasonal tale rolls around just in time for the end of summer. This is the first time the legendary filmmaker's film has screened in U.S. theaters.

September 26th, 2014: Jealousy. No one shares Philippe Garrel's flair for capturing the unadorned intricacies of human behavior. Jealousy is being called one of Garrel's most accessible works.

Click on a film or keep scrolling for more information!

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8/29 - A Summer's Tale


August 29th, 2014. 7pm at The Lincoln Theatre.

    A film by Éric Rohmer.

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8/29 - A Summer's Tale


August 29th, 2014. 7pm at The Lincoln Theatre.

    A film by Éric Rohmer.

A Summer's Tale (Conte d'été) (1996/2012) • Directed by Éric Rohmer • France • 114 Minutes

The film will be introduced by Steven Pustay, an adjunct specialist instructor at Malone University in Canton, Ohio. Pustay's work frequently explores the intersections of technology and spectacle in both classic and contemporary cinema. His current project is an investigation of shifting representations of death across film, television, and video games since the digital turn.

"The multifaceted, deeply personal dramatic universe of Eric Rohmer has had an effect on cinema unlike any other. One of the founding critics of the history-making Cahiers du cinéma, Rohmer began translating his written manifestos to film in the sixties, standing apart from his New Wave contemporaries, like François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, with his patented brand of gently existential, hyperarticulate character studies set against vivid seasonal landscapes."

~~ Criterion

"This strangely rigid comedy by Éric Rohmer, from 1996, starts with a tensely lyrical sequence in which Gaspard (Melvil Poupaud), a young mathematician and aspiring musician, spends too much time alone while awaiting his girlfriend at a crowded Brittany resort town. Gaspard befriends Margot (Amanda Langlet), a graduate student with whom he shares much, but not desire. For that, there’s her friend Solène (Gwenaëlle Simon), an impulsive bank clerk, whose hold on him is challenged by the arrival of his girlfriend, Léna (Aurelia Nolin), an imperious bourgeoise with breezy manners that veil a tough, glossy sense of power. Despite the bright summer sun and the inviting expanses, Rohmer’s film is tight and airless; though it’s set in the present day, the febrile formalities evoke a vanished age—that of the director’s own youth—in which worldly witticisms and ponderous aphorisms both conceal and deflect passion. Gaspard’s providential confidence in his artistic dreams also harks back to Rohmer’s own inchoate days, as if the director had been waiting half a century for the artistry with which he could exorcise his memories of embarrassment, pain, and sexual frustration."

~~ Richard Brody, The New Yorker

A seductive summer duet.

Beach blanket ambivalence?

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9/26 - Jealousy


September 26th, 2014. 7pm at The Lincoln Theatre.

    A film by Philippe Garrel. 

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9/26 - Jealousy


September 26th, 2014. 7pm at The Lincoln Theatre.

    A film by Philippe Garrel. 

Jealousy (La Jalousie) (2013) • Directed by Philippe Garrel • France • 77 Minutes

An existential stroll in the park.

Bon appetit!

“No one shares Garrel’s flair for capturing the unadorned intricacies of human behavior.” ~~ Max Nelson, Reverse Shot

"Jealousy is, as a Garrel film, both very familiar and very surprising. The project came together quickly and cheaply, after a sequel/continuation to Un été brûlant (2011), again to feature Monica Bellucci, fell apart. The film displays a casual mastery – of framing (by veteran cinematographer Willy Kurant in black-and-white widescreen), of the choreography of bodies and actions in daily settings, of the mixing of professional and non-professional performance styles – which is breathtaking in its simplicity and directness (as is the plaintive acoustic guitar-based score by Jean-Louis Aubert). Garrelian fans know the motifs (couples or families walking down streets, dining scenes, conversations with wise, wily old mentors), but they will be disarmed by the offhand freshness with which they are delivered – one would like to say sketched, as in a free-form drawing – here. Especially significant and notable is the remarkable rhythm that Garrel gives the film’s unfolding: at seventy-seven minutes, it covers a lot of ground (and not a small number of characters) in a gallop, without ever seemingly overly elliptical. This compression is a source of energy for Garrel’s style."

~~ Adrian Martin, Transit